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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Charles Lewis
Investigative Journalist, Executive Editor of the Investigative Reporting Workshop at the American University School of Communication in D.C. and Author of
WHYY 06/28/2014
Lewis: It was the extent of this. This is a systemic problem we have here. We have an inability to get the truth in real time. And the media has complete inability to find out the truth in real time. And when it's right in front of their face, they don't always report it. And so we really have a problem here because, if we don't know what the truth is in this country, we don't have a country. It's end of story. It's not our country anymore. This is fundamental. And if the public doesn't care about facts then journalists, frankly, are not terribly relevant either.
Charles Lewis
Investigative Journalist, Executive Editor of the Investigative Reporting Workshop at the American University School of Communication in D.C. and Author of
WHYY 06/28/2014
Moyers: You know James Risen, "the New York Times" reporter, right? Lewis: uh-huh. Moyers: He has refused to testify before a grand jury, under subpoena, and reveal a confidential source of information in his book, "State of War," about the secret U.S. campaign against the Iranian nuclear program. The Supreme Court has refused to hear his case. And Risen now says he will go to jail if necessary. What are the stakes in this case? Lewis: well, they're very high. I mean, there's very -- they're very high for Jim in particular, obviously. He could end up in prison, found in contempt by a judge for not testifying, not answering some questions the government asks. If it gets to that point. There is a chance that the U.S. Justice Department will choose to not proceed at this point.
Charles Lewis
Investigative Journalist, Executive Editor of the Investigative Reporting Workshop at the American University School of Communication in D.C. and Author of
WHYY 06/28/2014
Lewis: There's only about 15 or so people that do that (national security reporting) full-time in the United States. In a country of 300-plus million people, only 15 or so do it for a full-time job. And Jim Risen happens to be one. And as you know he's the one who co-authored the domestic surveillance stories that won the Pulitzer back in '05. Today the dirty little secret in Washington is that we have thousands of cameras. Every cell phone has a gps tracking device. And you also can't check into any government agency and sign in to get in to meet with someone because the government has that information and they'll know who came. And if you call them, their calls are potentially monitored. And there is a general belief widely shared that your emails are scraped, or at least accessed. Lewis: know journalists who've been told privately by folks in the NSA and elsewhere that that's basically not untrue.
Elijah Cummings
Representative (D-MD), Ranking Member, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform
MSNBCW 06/30/2014
P. Alexander: I quote from the new NSA Director (Adm. Michael Rogers) who specifically said that the revelations in his opinion do not lead him to the conclusion that the sky is falling. So is the sky falling? How big is the damage? Cummings: I don't think necessarily the sky is falling, but I think there has been substantial damage. And I think it's going to be a good idea if we could bring Mr. Snowden back here to our country to face justice and perhaps see everything that he has. Keep in mind there's a lot of things that he has that we are not sure about. He's released quite a bit of information already. I think it has done damage with regard to some other countries and certainly the people of the United States are very concerned because they've now learned how much of their personal information is getting into NSA and being possibly used by NSA.
Judy Woodruff
Co-Anchor and Managing Editor of the PBS NewsHour
KQED 07/02/2014
Woodruff: A bipartisan government panel reported today the national security agency's internet surveillance is an effective tool against terrorism. A "Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board," a group appointed by the President, said the so-called "prism" program, under a provision of the foreign intelligence surveillance act, "section 702," is constitutional. David Medine chairs the board. Medine: Overall the board has found that the information the program collects has been valuable and effective in protecting the national security and producing valuable foreign intelligence information … outside of this fundamental core, certain aspects of the section 702 program do raise privacy concerns and push the program close to the line of constitutional reasonableness.
Judy Woodruff
Co-Anchor and Managing Editor of the PBS NewsHour
KQED 07/02/2014
Woodruff: The panel's report on internet surveillance contrasted sharply with its earlier finding on phone data collection. It said that effort lacked a viable legal foundation and should be shut down.
Leland Vittert
FOX News Channel foreign news correspondent
FOXNEWSW 07/06/2014
Vittert: There are new revelations in the NSA spying scandal. according to new information provided by fugitive NSA leaker Edward Snowden and
David Medine
Chair, Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board
FOXNEWSW 07/06/2014
Medine: All in favor say Aye. Panel: Aye Medine: the vote is unanimous. Emanuel: A bipartisan Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board has voted to adopt a report in support of some of the NSA’s internet surveillance programs. Medine: Overall the board has found that the information the program collects has been valuable and effective in protecting the national security and producing valuable foreign intelligence information. Emanuel: The board concludes that PRISM gathering digital information from internet companies is clearly authorized by statute allowing collection as currently implemented. The core of the 702 program acquiring communications of targeted foreigners outside the U.S. fits the fourth amendment, and the group says it is troubled by the unknown and potentially large scope of the incidental collection of U.S. persons' communications, although members of the panel tried to offer some context. Brand: This is not a bulk collection program or dragnet. I don't think we can stress that often enough because it has been such a common misconception.
Elisebeth Collins
Privacy Oversight Board
FOXNEWSW 07/06/2014
Emanuel: The panel also issued detailed proposals to tighten up. Collins: The recommendations are designed to prevent the section 702 program from transforming over time from a foreign intelligence program to a means of effectively surveilling U.S. persons. Emanuel: The surveillance became public following leaks from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. On Capitol Hill, some liberals and conservatives have joined forces in recent months to speak out about privacy and civil liberties. Wyden: A particularly vigorous oversight over the intelligence field needs to get more attention. It's not something you can minimize. Liberty and security are not mutually exclusive. Paul: Some say it's only records held anonymously, only rarely accessed. What's your beef? What they rarely mention is that they don't believe any of your records have any fourth amendment protection.
John Larsen
PBS Correspondent
KQED 07/06/2014
Larsen: The Washington Post said it reviewed more than 160-thousands emails and instant message conversations, and another 8,000 documents that were collected between 2009 and 2012. The paper says
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